2019 e-Golf warranty?

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TyRed

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Joined
Apr 19, 2019
Messages
4
The VW site doesn't seem to have any warranty information for the 2019 e-Golf. The warranty page just says the standard VW warranty does not apply. Does anyone with a 2018 or 2019 model have current warranty information they could share?
 
TyRed said:
The VW site doesn't seem to have any warranty information for the 2019 e-Golf. The warranty page just says the standard VW warranty does not apply. Does anyone with a 2018 or 2019 model have current warranty information they could share?
I wrangled with this concern only a few months ago, so for me this is fresh. Obviously, I got over the concern/ found peace of mind/ found an economic solution to my liking because I drove the car off the lot last month...

The sales rep first offered the Drive Easy, however everything they cover, I (or my local mechanic) can do.

My last vehicle purchase is my ICE (heaviest carbon footprint, I know) 2005 Toyota Sequoia Limited. Still have it at 250K miles. Point is, I realized that it had power everything, traction control & a special Posi-Track AWD feature. Lots of electronic crap that could break & cost me $ to repair. So I invested in a Platinum Warranty (6yr/100K) that covered anything & everything (outside of normal wear): top to bottom, front to back. Living in New England, winters are hard on cars. While the truck has been awesome for me, it has had a number of small items that the warranty covered & the itemized Quote cost (pre-repair), more than paid for the plan. For at each repair, I asked what the bill WOULD be had it been out of pocket, for which I was conveniently given a Quote.

In those 6 years, I acquired the 2 Service Manuals (pdf) for my vehicle. 7000 pages of step by step instructions where Toyota instructs their service techs on the order of disassembly & re-assembly. Plus I have the tools. Yeah, I am a New Englander, I can do this. Hold my beer.

Alas, I digress. The e-Golf is a new shiny toy that I am about to learn about. For now, I am not going to tinker (too much). I want the peace of mind & so I made the financial choice to purchase a Platinum Warranty on the e-Golf. Which has already paid for itself, technically....

When my wife & I picked up our e-Golf at the beginning of March, our sales rep handed us our key fobs in the car & was "instructing" us on our new purchase. When my wife stepped on the brake, & pressed power (I still tease her about this): ALL the warning lights started going off. Not the normal cycle. Like repeated alarms with messages. All I could do was laugh. We had not even left the sales lot, she broke the car... (she hadn't)

The issue. Fault C101629 in the ABS/EDL controller. Would not clear.

What is the service cost of a ABS/EDL Control Module? Well, the Hydraulic Unit needs to be pulled & re-installed. The HV system needs to be disconnected & reconnected. & the brakes need a bleed.

Alas, this repair did not go on my Platinum Warranty. When we saw the car at 24 miles it did not have this issue. It appeared at 65 miles. So 40 miles later, it would have... 1K & a month later, all is still good.

Sorry for the novel, hope you enjoyed the read & good luck with your purchase. I think the e-Golf would be a good choice.
 
I chatted with VW customer care. The info is not on their site, but the rep indicated the standard warranty applies and is supposed to follow up next week with documentation.

Per the agent:

"For the 2019 e-Golf the NVLW warranty is 6 years or 72,000 miles whichever occurs first."

[update: turns out this was not accurate, see next reply]
 
The dealer sent me this info after they did some research:

- 3 years/36,000 miles vehicle warranty
- 5 years/60,000 miles power train and high voltage system
- 8 years/100,000 miles for the battery for defects/workmanship and net capacity below 70%

Interesting they couldn't answer the question off the bat.
 
TyRed said:
The dealer sent me this info after they did some research:

- 3 years/36,000 miles vehicle warranty
- 5 years/60,000 miles power train and high voltage system
- 8 years/100,000 miles for the battery for defects/workmanship and net capacity below 70%

Interesting they couldn't answer the question off the bat.

Oh I had sales rep's from 2 different dealers recite this verbatim on the first visit. It was when I was asking for extended warranty policies they got all vague.
 
Verbruggan said:
Alas, I digress. The e-Golf is a new shiny toy that I am about to learn about. For now, I am not going to tinker (too much). I want the peace of mind & so I made the financial choice to purchase a Platinum Warranty on the e-Golf. Which has already paid for itself, technically....

Would you mind sharing what you paid for the warranty?
 
I just traded in my 2016 eGolf and purchased a 2019 eGolf SE, also got convinced by the finance manager to buy the 10yr/100000 miles extended warranty that is supposed to be bumper to bumper with zero deductable. I haven't read all the fine prints yet.

I am still not sure whether I will cancel within the first 30 days.

Does anyone have experience with such warranty on the eGolf? I haven't had any issues with the 2016 eGolf for the first 3.5 years.
 
TwoCarsAWeek said:
I just traded in my 2016 eGolf and purchased a 2019 eGolf SE, also got convinced by the finance manager to buy the 10yr/100000 miles extended warranty that is supposed to be bumper to bumper with zero deductable. I haven't read all the fine prints yet.

I am still not sure whether I will cancel within the first 30 days.

Does anyone have experience with such warranty on the eGolf? I haven't had any issues with the 2016 eGolf for the first 3.5 years.

I will be at 24-25k miles in Oct, when my 2015 SEL is 4 years old. Zero issues, it's been absolutely perfect. Range is still very, very good, loss of from 129 miles to 115 currently, and it's July. I recharge at home, almost always. Treat a german car right, and it will treat you right. treat it sporty and abuse it, and the repair bills will mount up. I treat mine like an instrument, not a tool. 'nuff said. Best darn Urban Crawler I've ever owned, city streets is where it shines the best, killer miles per kWh, like 6.1, lifetime or better. I got the SEL because I wanted the fake leather seats for durability, and the LED headlights, which are superb. Not a single regret.
 
JoulesThief said:
Range is still very, very good, loss of from 129 miles to 115 currently,

10% after 4 years? Is this loss comparable to other brands besides the Leaf? (sounds high)
 
eGolfJoe said:
JoulesThief said:
Range is still very, very good, loss of from 129 miles to 115 currently,

10% after 4 years? Is this loss comparable to other brands besides the Leaf? (sounds high)

JoulesThief reports exceptional miles per kWh (~6.5mi/kWh) which might inflate the apparent loss. Few people regularly see 129mi on a 83mi epa range model!

Additionally, I believe JT usually charges the battery to ~95% on the in-dash charge gauge and then runs it down to around 25% like a gas tank before refilling. A lot of discussion on lithium batteries suggests that this might cause them to wear a faster than plugging in daily to top up to 80%

One thing to note is that the degradation rate isn’t linear; like a lot of lithium batteries there’s initially some degradation in the first few years, then the battery stabilises at that new level. 10% is higher than I’ve seen most people report. I’ve seen no change in range on our 2016 in the year we have had it. 104mi is the highest I’ve seen on the guess-o-meter, both when it was new and also recently. Doesn’t mean it hadn’t degraded any before we got it, but that at least our one is not continuously degrading week by week, if that makes sense.

Its a shame VW doesn’t make it easy to check degradation. There are so many factors that could affect range on the GOM outside of the battery itself!

On the topic of other manufacturers, I think Tesla has been running into some degradation issues, despite the oft repeated claim that their batteries somehow barely degrade. They had to cut up to about 25% range from 85kWh Model S units because of battery degradation issues, speculated to be due to the cars catching fire when continued to be charged once that badly degraded. That may be specific to that one battery pack type though, I’m not sure.
 
I watched my e mpg range drop from 129 to 122 or 123 by first year birthday.

By 2nd birthday, I was at 117 to 118

By third birthday 115 to 116.

We will see what I am at by Oct 2019, it's 4th year birthday. I am predicting 113 to 114. The degradation in years 2.5 to now,coming up on year 4, has slowed down considerably.

Best advice is don't use DCFC, if at all possible, recharge only when cool, at least here in CA, and if you recharge fully, have it reach full charge on the gauge as close as possible to your departure time, and start driving as soon as possible once it's full. Otherwise, charge it to 90% indicated, as the fuel gauge already really only charges it up to 90 % when it's indicating that the battery is full. VW saves a reserve factor in there, for as the car ages and degrades.

Lastly, keep the fuel gauge out of the red. Red on a German car means stop what you are doing and fix the problem RED ALWAYS means STOP, and fix it. Try to never run your fuel gauge into the red, and it would probably be best to recharge when your gauge shows 1/4 tank or more of electricity left. 33% would probably be a wee bit better.
 
As long as you’re charging as soon as you park, I wouldn’t have too much concern running down to 10% when necessary, with 20% being my standard ‘go no lower’ level.

The biggest problem with low state of charge is that the lower voltage means to get the same amount of power the current has to be much higher, which the cells can not handle. So the vehicle limits available power so as not to overwork the depleted battery.

My understanding is that the main concern from low voltage in the battery is the polarity reversing within the battery from having such low voltage in a cell, but in reality the BMS isn’t going to let you run down that low. This is as compared with degradation from high voltage which leads to lithium plating and parasitic reactions within the cell as the voltage gets higher and higher, beginning within the normal operating range of the battery

What I’ve read suggests that 10%-80% is slightly better than 20%-90%. Unless you need the range, I would personally charge to 80% in the 36KWh models. I don’t like to leave it sitting at 20% though. (I charge to 70% because my commute is so short. I actually worry because I don’t often go below 50%..... I might be leaving my battery too high on average?)

Would love someone more knowledgeable to provide more information and correct me on any bad assumptions I’ve made though!
 
uscpsycho said:
Verbruggan said:
Alas, I digress. The e-Golf is a new shiny toy that I am about to learn about. For now, I am not going to tinker (too much). I want the peace of mind & so I made the financial choice to purchase a Platinum Warranty on the e-Golf. Which has already paid for itself, technically....

Would you mind sharing what you paid for the warranty?

What was quoted:

$0 ded. - 84mon/100K platinum = $2550

Another quote from a different dealer was:

8yr/100K Platinum = $2231 w/$100 disappearing deductible

10yr/120K Platinum = $2806 w/ $100 disappearing deductible.

What I paid is what was negotiated. This was their starting point. They get commissions on these as they are 3rd Party insurance. However they are honoured by all VW dealers. Good luck.
 
TyRed said:
The dealer sent me this info after they did some research:

- 3 years/36,000 miles vehicle warranty
- 5 years/60,000 miles power train and high voltage system
- 8 years/100,000 miles for the battery for defects/workmanship and net capacity below 70%

Interesting they couldn't answer the question off the bat.

This is what I got on my 2019 e-Golf near DC. Talked the 10 year extended warranty down to $1800.
 
JoulesThief said:
I watched my e mpg range drop from 129 to 122 or 123 by first year birthday.

By 2nd birthday, I was at 117 to 118

By third birthday 115 to 116.

We will see what I am at by Oct 2019, it's 4th year birthday. I am predicting 113 to 114. The degradation in years 2.5 to now,coming up on year 4, has slowed down considerably.

Best advice is don't use DCFC, if at all possible, recharge only when cool, at least here in CA, and if you recharge fully, have it reach full charge on the gauge as close as possible to your departure time, and start driving as soon as possible once it's full. Otherwise, charge it to 90% indicated, as the fuel gauge already really only charges it up to 90 % when it's indicating that the battery is full. VW saves a reserve factor in there, for as the car ages and degrades.

Lastly, keep the fuel gauge out of the red. Red on a German car means stop what you are doing and fix the problem RED ALWAYS means STOP, and fix it. Try to never run your fuel gauge into the red, and it would probably be best to recharge when your gauge shows 1/4 tank or more of electricity left. 33% would probably be a wee bit better.

Oct 6th 2019 came and went. I am seeing GOM ranges of 113 to 115, now that the car is 4 years old and at 24,500 miles on the odometer. Not sure if it's miles or age decline, for the condition of the battery range, or both. No DC fast charges at all in the past year, 99% of my charging at home in the garage, and $14 worth of EVSE services at a shopping mall with a Costco, bought from ChargePoint Level 2 charger.
 
rmcclelland said:
TyRed said:
The dealer sent me this info after they did some research:

- 3 years/36,000 miles vehicle warranty
- 5 years/60,000 miles power train and high voltage system
- 8 years/100,000 miles for the battery for defects/workmanship and net capacity below 70%

Interesting they couldn't answer the question off the bat.

This is what I got on my 2019 e-Golf near DC. Talked the 10 year extended warranty down to $1800.

May I ask what the 10 year extended warranty entails? Platinum, 10 year/ 100 K/ $100 deductible?
 

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